Museums publish two hidden pages from Anne Frank's diary

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Anne wrote her diary while in hiding from the Nazis with her family during World War II.

He edited and published her writings in hiding after the war, making Anne Frank one of the world's most famous Holocaust victims.Anne Frank wrote the jokes on September 28, 1942, just three months after the family began their two-year stay at the hiding place.

Leopold and a senior researcher on the project, Peter de Bruijn, both expressed to the Times the value of the uncovered diary pages for offering more insight into Anne Frank's development as a writer rather than for the content she wrote about.

The Anne Frank House Museum said at a presentation that it, and several Dutch historical institutes, were able to reproduce the lost pages after years of study by shining a light through them and photographing them in high resolution. The pages include 4 dirty jokes. "They make it clear that Anne, with all her gifts, was above all also an ordinary girl".

"It's a very cautious start to her becoming a writer", Leopold told the New York Times. On prostitution, Frank noted that "in Paris they have big houses for that".

"I'll use this spoiled page to write down "dirty" jokes", a 13-year-old Anne wrote on a page with crossed-out sentences.


A video shows the text underneath two taped off pages from Anne Frank's diary during a press conference at The Anne Frank Foundation's office in Amsterdam, Netherlands, Tuesday, May 15, 2018.

However, he said it provides an early example of how Anne "creates a fictional situation that makes it easier for her to address the sensitive topics that she writes about".

She also described a young woman getting her period around age 14 as "a sign that she is ripe to have relations with a man but one doesn't do that of course before one is married".

Defending the decision to release the newly-found texts, the foundation said "over the decades Anne has grown to become the worldwide symbol of the Holocaust, and Anne the girl has increasingly faded into the background".

In her diary, Anne chronicled her life in hiding until August 1944, when her family was most likely betrayed and sent to Nazi concentration camps.

The house where the Franks hid has been turned into museum, making it one of Amsterdam's most visited attractions.

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