Study Reveals Surprising Consequences Of Trying A Single Cigarette

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On average, 60 percent of respondents admitted to having tried a cigarette. The study included data from countries like the UK, Australia and New Zealand.

Researchers from Queen Mary University, London, analyzed the results of eight surveys on smoking habits in English-speaking countries and found that a single cigarette is enough to spark a daily smoking habit - at least temporarily - in 69 percent of people.

"We've found that the conversion rate from "first time smoker" to "daily smoker" is surprisingly high", he said.

This is the first time a link between trying cigarettes and establishing a smoking habit has been demonstrated with such a large data set, Hajek added.

Further, Hajek revealed that the United Kingdom witnessed a commendable reduction in smoking, and the recent findings confirm that.


"The UK is seeing a dramatic reduction in smoking at the moment and this tallies with recent findings that only 19 per cent of 11-15 year olds have ever tried a cigarette, so the good news is that we are on the right track".

"Very few non-smokers who try e-cigarettes become daily vapers, while such a large proportion on non-smokers who try conventional cigarettes become daily smokers".

In 2016, 15.5% of adults from the United Kingdom smoked - about 7.6 million people - according to the Office for National Statistics, down from 19.9% in 2010.

Nearly nine out of 10 cigarette smokers in the US first tried smoking before they were 18, according to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

However, Deborah Arnott, chief executive of the charity Action on Smoking and Health, believes the government should make more stringent rules to regulate tobacco sales. To everyone's surprise, the company is running full-page advertisements in several United Kingdom newspapers, stating that it aims to stop selling cigarettes in Britain sometime in the future, notes CBSNews. Since the different surveys used a range of methodologies, this estimated conversion rate was assigned a margin of error, meaning it could be as low as 60.9 percent and as high as 76.9 percent. She said, "The government is refusing to introduce licensing for tobacco retailers, even though there is strong support for this both from the public and retailers". But, he noted, the influence of e-cigarettes should also be explored, since the decline in smoking rates in England has accelerated since the devices came onto the market.

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