Eating Small Bits Of Cheese Daily Helps Lower Heart Disease Risks

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Researchers from China and the Netherlands looked at information from 200,000 people, gathered in 15 observational studies.

They found people who ate small amounts of cheese daily had better heart health than people who abstained or ate it rarely. All but one of the studies excluded people with existing heart disease, and all but two tracked people for 10 years or more. That means there could be other reasons why cheese lovers have lower risks for stroke and heart disease. In 2015, the population of the United States consumed the equivalent of of cheese per person, with Cheddar and mozzarella being the most popular choices.

But it's also possible that cheese has beneficial qualities that offset the negative impact of its high saturated fat content, says Stewart.

Generally, cheese has always been the scourge of every health-conscious person who wants to make sure they have a balanced diet while still loving themselves enough to partake in the simple joy of one of Earth's greatest pleasures. (But the findings were) certainly different from what people might expect.


A 40 gram square, about the size of matchbox, was the sweet spot for health benefits.

In fact, researchers cited a recent randomized controlled trial of 153 participants that ate high-fat cheese regularly for eight weeks did not increase their total cholesterol or LDL-C levels, but reduced triglycerides among subjects. More isn't necessarily better, though.

Cheese contains healthy ingredients like protein, calcium and probiotics, according to the study authors.

Cheese, glorious cheese. When Christmas comes around, we love the pungent stuff even more than usual. While it may seem like a lot of the dairy product, it's an average of 36 grams per day, which is slightly less than the amount recommended by researchers. "It's promising to find that something that actually tastes good-and pairs well with a nice glass of red wine-may offer some protection, as well".

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