Samsung starts mass-producing first ever 512GB chips for mobile devices

Share

The new solution will provide a huge boost for storage on flagship phones, as well as another product for the strong performing division of Samsung to continue growth.

Samsung's new 512GB embedded Universal Flash Storage module is said to be coming next year and the Note 9 and S9 could be the first devices to benefit from them.

This brings us to Samsung's announcement of the 512GB eUFS chip that should provide "unparalleled storage capacity and outstanding performance for upcoming flagship smartphones and tablets".

"By assuring an early, stable supply of this advanced embedded storage, Samsung is taking a big step forward in contributing to timely launches of next-generation mobile devices by mobile manufacturers around the world". This is particularly nice as apps get larger and photos/videos get crispier, but soon you'll be able to pick up a phone (at least from Samsung) with a whopping 512GB of storage out of the box.


The new 512GB UFS device consists of eight 64-layer 512-gigabit V-NAND chips stacked together with a controller chip.

With 512GB of eUFS storage, Samsung says that a flagship smartphone would be able to store approximately 130 4K Ultra HD (3,840 x 2,160) video clips of a 10 minute duration. Despite offering twice the storage, it's still the same size as the 48-layer V-NAND-based 256GB eUFS Samsung launched in February past year. However, that barrier has now been broken as Samsung today has officially announced its new 512GB embedded UFS solution.

On the performance side of things, the 512GB chip has read speeds that max out at 860MB/s and write speeds of 255MB/s. The new eUFS can also read 42,000 IOPS and write 40,000 IOPS for random operations, which is about 400 times faster than a microSD card.

Samsung's also announced that it "intends to steadily increase an aggressive production volume for its 64-layer 512Gb V-NAND chips, in addition to expanding its 256Gb V-NAND production". That means you only need about six seconds to transfer an HD video clip to an SSD, Samsung says. Compare that to the 100 IOPS that conventional MicroSD cards read and you have about a 400x improvement in performance.

Share