Code.org raises $12M to help more kids learn computer science

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Students who are interested in coding can continue their education, as Harrisonburg High School offers two classes on it, as do some of the governors' schools in the area, including AP Computer Science.

According to Hadi Partovi, founder and CEO of Code.org, 10 million girls now have accounts on the site. And yet, only 11 states have created K-12 computer science standards. The "Hour of Code" events are sponsored in partnership with Code.org with the goal of teaching computer science in a fun and creative way that appeals to children of all ages and backgrounds.

During Computer Science Education Week, Code.org encourages students and educators to partake in Hour of Code - a one-hour introduction to computer science that aims to "demystify code" and teach its basic principles.

"Computer programming skills are critical for many 21st century jobs", Gov. Cooper said.

McCarthy said she hopes her students feel prepared when they enter high school and take other science related courses.


Code.org also celebrated new pledges from states, school districts and organizations to expand access to computer science education.

"Computer science education provides foundational learning in computational thinking that enables students to develop and apply critical thinking skills, demonstrate imagination and creativity, practice collaboration, exhibit leadership, and employ problem-solving skills", the proclamation reads.

"While significant work remains ahead, today's pledges, dedication, and support reflect unprecedented global momentum behind the vision that every student in every school deserves the opportunity to learn computer science", Code.org founder Hadi Partovi said in a statement.

Governor Doug Ducey visited the Phoenix Coding Academy on Monday to kick off Computer Science Education Week.

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