Congresswomen accuse two USA lawmakers of sexual harassment

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Speaker Paul Ryan has announced that the House will adopt a policy requiring all members of Congress and their staffs to undergo training to prevent sexual harassment.

Ryan says in a statement, "our goal is not only to raise awareness, but also make abundantly clear that harassment in any form has no place in this institution". On Tuesday, speaking before the Committee on House Administration, Speier said that since launching #MeTooCongress, current and former staffers have flooded her office with stories of unwanted sexual advances, touching, and, in one case, exposure.

'That kind of situation, what are we doing here for women, right now, who are dealing with someone like that?' Comstock asked.

According to Comstock, when the aide arrived, the lawmaker opened the door only wearing a towel, invited the staffer inside and then exposed himself.

"In fact there are two members of Congress, Republican and Democrat, who serve right now who have been subject to review, or not been subject to review, that have engaged in sexual harassment", said Speier.


California Congresswoman Jackie Speier revealed that two current members of Congress, who she wouldn't name, have sexually harassed staffers. As Republicans distance themselves from Moore, lawmakers in the House and Senate are working to address sexual misconduct in the Congressional workplace. A number of lawmakers have also come forward and shared stories of harassment they faced - either during their time as lawmakers or when they previously worked on Capitol Hill as aides.

The House hearing addressed the need to update the chamber's policies on misconduct claims, and bipartisan calls to implement mandatory sexual harassment training for both lawmakers and staff.

As for Moore, he has denied the allegations against him, but his support among mainstream Republicans has plummeted one month before the December 12 special election. Payouts to the victims were not financed by the people who engaged in sexual harassment but by taxpayers.

"All they ask in return as staff members is to be able to work in a hostile-free work environment", she continued.

Barbara Childs Wallace, the chair of the Office of Compliance's board of directors, called the mandatory training that lawmakers are calling for a necessary first step, but said more changes are needed to improve the culture on Capitol Hill. After 30 days of mandatory mediation, during which the office or member is represented by House of Representatives counsel, they then have to go through a 30 day "cooling off period".

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