Texas church shooter used dogs as 'target practice': ex-colleague

Share

He also pleaded guilty to hitting her young son's head and body, fracturing his skull, and was subsequently sentenced to a year in a military prison. "He (pleaded) to intentionally doing it, served a year of confinement, then received a bad conduct discharge".

They said Kelley showed up at a church festival dressed in black and acted so strangely that people kept a close eye on him.

The latter claim might prove hard, said Sisk, as the defense could claim that, even if Kelley had failed a background check, he could still have committed his crime with illegally obtained instead of legally purchased guns.

"And he had a gun in his holster right here and he took that gun out, and he put it to my temple and he told me, 'Do you want to die?"

She said Kelley told her he was "using the dogs as target practice".

Tune into Inside Edition Monday for more of the exclusive interview with Tessa Brennaman and to hear how she reacted when she found out her ex-husband was behind the massacre.

"He would make jokes about wanting to kill somebody", Edwards recalled.

After graduating from high school, Kelley joined the Air Force and, based on an aptitude test, he was selected to become an intelligence specialist dedicated to the interpretation of enemy tactics.

"He would choke me, punch me, kick me", she said.


One member of the community, Judy Green, said he was "completely distant and way out in thought".

If Kelley had been carrying a weapon, Rod Green said, he would have escorted him away because of all the children there.

"There would be times where I would be on the floor curled up, and having to protect my organs because he would be violently kicking me on my side", she said in the interview clips released by "Inside Edition".

'There was something wrong with the picture, ' she said.

"I was so angry", she said through tears.

Brennaman filed for divorce and Kelley went on to marry his second wife, Danielle Shields, in 2014.

Armed with a powerful assault rifle, Kelly opened fire on worshippers at a Sunday service inside a rural church.

The shooter then died of a self-inflicted wound after being shot and chased by two residents when he was leaving the church, authorities said. In addition to regular sessions with a chaplain, she says Air Force officials referred him to the mental health office.

Eleven people were still in the hospital Friday with wounds from the shooting.

Share