Missouri starts investigating Google's business practices

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Attorney General Josh Hawley of the state of Missouri issued an investigative subpoena to determine whether the company's actions violated state antitrust and consumer protection laws.

Google was facing a broad investigation into its business practices Monday, with American officials planning to examine how the internet giant handles user data and offers up search results. Google has challenged the decision in Europe, citing competitors like Amazon and eBay and arguing that its process doesn't favor "ourselves, or any particular site or seller" but rather is "the result of hard work and constant innovation, based on user feedback". One month later, the Electronic Privacy Information Center filed a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission regarding a Google program that tracks consumer behavior.

We've reached out to Google with a request for comment and will update when we hear back.


Also of interest to Hawley's investigation is the roughly 70 percent of all card transaction information that Google collects. But the Federal Trade Commission settled with Google in 2013 and said it didn't find any reasons to impose radical changes on how the company runs its Internet search engine.

Statement from Hawley, who is up for reelection: "When a company has access to as much consumer information as Google does, it's my duty to ensure they are using it appropriately".

Google rolled out its Google Fiber broadband service in the Kansas City area in 2012.

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