Facebook Combats "Revenge Porn" With New Algorithm

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Would you trust Facebook with your nude photos?

The dominant social media platform is trying to help combat revenge porn from ever making it online.

The scheme is aimed at people who are anxious partners or ex-partners may share the images without their consent - and is being trialled in Australia, the US, Canada and the UK.

Facebook is trying to combat "revenge porn" by encouraging users in Australia to submit their nude photos to a pilot project created to prevent intimate images from being shared without consent.

Australia's e-safety commissioner Julia Inman Grant told ABC, 'We see many scenarios where maybe photos or videos were taken consensually at one point, but there was not any sort of consent to send the images or videos more broadly'. "Digital fingerprints" would be added to images to ensure they are spotted and prevented from being uploaded. When uploading content to Facebook or any other site, there is always a fear that the content could be used to harass or bully the original uploader.


Prof Clare McGlynn, from Durham Law School, said that the United Kingdom should establish a similar organisation to Australia's e-safety commission.

Once Facebook is notified, they use image-matching technology to access and tag the image to prevent anyone from sharing it on their platforms.

But that still requires human workers and human eyes on the sensitive images. While Facebook originally announced these plans in April, the pilot program is now underway.

The limited pilot program is available in three other countries: the USA, U.K., and Canada. "This pilot has the potential to disable the control and power perpetrators hold over victims, particularly in cases of ex-partner retribution and sextortion, and the subsequent harm that could come to them", says Inman Grant.

Turns out, before the image can be "hashed", an actual human at Facebook has to look at it to make sure it "fits the definition of revenge porn".

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